Let’s face &#105&#116: some kids &#106&#117&#115&#116 don’t &#108&#105&#107&#101 to &#114&#101&#97&#100. &#73&#110&#99&#114&#101&#97&#115&#105&#110&#103&#108&#121, parents, teachers, librarians, &#97&#110&#100 editors &#97&#114&#101 &#108&#111&#111&#107&#105&#110&#103 for books that &#119&#105&#108&#108 appeal &#116&#111 reluctant &#114&#101&#97&#100&#101&#114&#115. When &#73 was writing &#84&#104&#101 Best Books &#102&#111&#114 Kids Who (Think They) Hate to Read (Random House), I read hundreds of children’s books, old and &#110&#101&#119, that &#73 thought would &#102&#105&#116 &#116&#104&#101 bill. I discovered that there &#97&#114&#101 &#101&#105&#103&#104&#116 qualities possessed by great &#98&#111&#111&#107&#115 &#102&#111&#114 &#114&#101&#108&#117&#99&#116&#97&#110&#116 &#114&#101&#97&#100&#101&#114&#115, and to my &#115&#117&#114&#112&#114&#105&#115&#101 &#115&#111&#109&#101 of my &#99&#104&#105&#108&#100&#104&#111&#111&#100 &#102&#97&#118&#111&#114&#105&#116&#101&#115 didn’t &#112&#97&#115&#115 &#116&#104&#101 &#116&#101&#115&#116. If &#121&#111&#117 &#99&#97&#110 &#119&#111&#114&#107 at least three of the elements listed &#98&#101&#108&#111&#119 into your book, it will have &#97 good chance &#111&#102 being loved &#98&#121 all kids, even those to whom reading &#105&#115 a chore.

* Humor. Making kids &#108&#97&#117&#103&#104 &#105&#115 essential &#116&#111 building a pleasant &#97&#115&#115&#111&#99&#105&#97&#116&#105&#111&#110 &#119&#105&#116&#104 reading. But you need to understand what tickles &#107&#105&#100&#115′ funny bones &#97&#116 &#100&#105&#102&#102&#101&#114&#101&#110&#116 ages. The humor in picture &#98&#111&#111&#107&#115 is &#98&#114&#111&#97&#100 and very visual. &#69&#97&#115&#121 &#114&#101&#97&#100&#101&#114&#115 &#40&#97&#110&#100 some picture books for ages 6 &#97&#110&#100 &#117&#112&#41 begin to introduce &#118&#101&#114&#98&#97&#108 humor: &#119&#111&#114&#100&#112&#108&#97&#121, puns, double meanings. As kids move &#105&#110&#116&#111 &#116&#104&#101 &#99&#104&#97&#112&#116&#101&#114 book arena they can &#104&#97&#110&#100&#108&#101 jokes that &#110&#101&#101&#100 a setup and &#97 payoff that’s played &#111&#117&#116 over &#115&#101&#118&#101&#114&#97&#108 scenes. Dialogue, how &#99&#104&#97&#114&#97&#99&#116&#101&#114&#115 &#114&#101&#97&#99&#116 to each other, &#111&#114 &#116&#104&#101 situation in which a &#99&#104&#97&#114&#97&#99&#116&#101&#114 finds himself &#109&#97&#121 be &#105&#110&#110&#97&#116&#101&#108&#121 humorous.

* Well-Defined Characters. &#77&#97&#110&#121 kids want to &#105&#100&#101&#110&#116&#105&#102&#121 strongly &#119&#105&#116&#104 the characters in their books for &#114&#101&#108&#117&#99&#116&#97&#110&#116 readers, this is &#101&#115&#115&#101&#110&#116&#105&#97&#108. It doesn’t matter what the character &#108&#111&#111&#107&#115 like on &#116&#104&#101 outside (be it space alien, a clown or a talking &#102&#114&#111&#103&#41, on the inside this character needs to embody &#116&#104&#101 &#112&#101&#114&#115&#112&#101&#99&#116&#105&#118&#101 of the reader. &#84&#104&#105&#115 means &#116&#104&#101 &#99&#104&#97&#114&#97&#99&#116&#101&#114 is dealing &#119&#105&#116&#104 issues &#116&#104&#101 reader &#109&#105&#103&#104&#116 face, &#111&#114 &#115&#101&#101&#105&#110&#103 the &#119&#111&#114&#108&#100 in a childlike way. &#66&#111&#111&#107 characters must have multidimensional personalities with strengths &#97&#110&#100 weaknesses &#105&#110 order &#102&#111&#114 &#116&#104&#101 reader to care about them and want to stick with them &#102&#111&#114 the entire story. In &#110&#111&#110&#102&#105&#99&#116&#105&#111&#110 such &#97&#115 biographies, authors who find &#97&#110 element of their subject’s &#108&#105&#102&#101 that is relevant to the target audience have &#97 better &#99&#104&#97&#110&#99&#101 of reaching reluctant readers.

* Fast-Paced &#80&#108&#111&#116. Kids who &#108&#111&#118&#101 to read don’t mind a story &#116&#104&#97&#116 takes a few chapters to unfold, &#98&#117&#116 reluctant readers don’t have that &#109&#117&#99&#104 patience. The &#97&#99&#116&#105&#111&#110 needs &#116&#111 &#115&#116&#97&#114&#116 in the first &#112&#97&#114&#97&#103&#114&#97&#112&#104, and by the &#101&#110&#100 &#111&#102 the &#102&#105&#114&#115&#116 &#99&#104&#97&#112&#116&#101&#114 the reader should know &#113&#117&#105&#116&#101 &#97 bit &#97&#98&#111&#117&#116 &#116&#104&#101 main character and have a &#103&#111&#111&#100 &#105&#100&#101&#97 about the &#99&#111&#110&#102&#108&#105&#99&#116 &#111&#114 problem that &#99&#104&#97&#114&#97&#99&#116&#101&#114 will &#102&#97&#99&#101. Subplots are fine &#102&#111&#114 chapter books &#97&#110&#100 up, &#98&#117&#116 too many &#119&#105&#108&#108 get in the way of the forward movement &#111&#102 story. Keep the pages &#116&#117&#114&#110&#105&#110&#103.

&#13&#10&#42 Concise chapters. Ideally, each chapter &#115&#104&#111&#117&#108&#100 &#99&#111&#110&#116&#97&#105&#110 &#111&#110&#101 clear event (or one specific point in &#110&#111&#110&#102&#105&#99&#116&#105&#111&#110&#41, and have an &#97&#114&#99 of its &#111&#119&#110 (a beginning, middle and end). &#84&#104&#105&#115 makes reading even one chapter a satisfying experience. Chapters that &#101&#110&#100 on a high note &#105&#110 the action &#119&#105&#108&#108 &#109&#97&#107&#101 the reader want to see what &#104&#97&#112&#112&#101&#110&#115 &#110&#101&#120&#116. Episodic &#110&#111&#118&#101&#108&#115 &#40&#119&#104&#101&#114&#101 &#101&#97&#99&#104 &#99&#104&#97&#112&#116&#101&#114 stands alone as &#97 short &#115&#116&#111&#114&#121&#41 are &#97&#108&#115&#111 good &#98&#101&#116&#115 for &#114&#101&#108&#117&#99&#116&#97&#110&#116 &#114&#101&#97&#100&#101&#114&#115. Richard Peck’s &#65 &#76&#111&#110&#103 &#87&#97&#121 from Chicago &#97&#110&#100 &#76&#111&#117&#105&#115 Sachar’s Sideways Stories from Wayside School &#97&#114&#101 two middle grade examples.

* &#75&#105&#100 Relevance. This applies to &#116&#104&#101 themes and ideas that &#102&#111&#114&#109 the basis &#102&#111&#114 plots or &#104&#111&#119 an author &#97&#112&#112&#114&#111&#97&#99&#104&#101&#115 &#97 &#110&#111&#110&#102&#105&#99&#116&#105&#111&#110 topic. These ideas &#115&#104&#111&#117&#108&#100 be relevant, meaningful, and applicable &#116&#111 the reader’s life. Instead of &#99&#111&#110&#118&#101&#121&#105&#110&#103 a lesson &#121&#111&#117&#114 adult &#112&#101&#114&#115&#112&#101&#99&#116&#105&#118&#101 tells you &#116&#104&#101 reader needs to know, &#116&#114&#121 &#117&#115&#105&#110&#103 the reader’s &#102&#114&#97&#109&#101 of reference &#97&#115 a starting point. Write to your audience, &#110&#111&#116 at them. And remember, &#98&#111&#111&#107&#115 can be just for fun.

* Suitable &#84&#101&#120&#116. Depending &#111&#110 the age &#97&#110&#100 ability of &#116&#104&#101 reader, &#116&#104&#101 text &#110&#101&#101&#100&#115 &#116&#111 &#98&#101 challenging but not overwhelming. &#83&#116&#114&#105&#118&#101 to &#119&#114&#105&#116&#101 your &#115&#116&#111&#114&#121 as &#99&#108&#101&#97&#114&#108&#121 &#97&#115 you can, using &#97&#99&#116&#105&#118&#101 sentences and concrete nouns &#97&#110&#100 verbs. &#87&#104&#101&#110 writing &#102&#111&#114 a broad age range of reluctant readers (8-12, for example), &#109&#97&#107&#101 &#116&#104&#101 &#118&#111&#99&#97&#98&#117&#108&#97&#114&#121 accessible to the &#121&#111&#117&#110&#103&#101&#114 end, but the &#105&#110&#116&#101&#114&#101&#115&#116 level appealing to &#107&#105&#100&#115 on the older &#101&#110&#100 &#111&#102 the spectrum.

* Unique &#80&#114&#101&#115&#101&#110&#116&#97&#116&#105&#111&#110. Reluctant readers often &#99&#104&#111&#111&#115&#101 nonfiction &#111&#118&#101&#114 &#102&#105&#99&#116&#105&#111&#110 because &#105&#116 &#115&#112&#101&#97&#107&#115 to their personal interests. &#70&#105&#110&#100&#105&#110&#103 a new or &#117&#110&#117&#115&#117&#97&#108 slant &#116&#111 &#121&#111&#117&#114 topic helps keep that &#105&#110&#116&#101&#114&#101&#115&#116 alive. Humor &#100&#111&#101&#115&#110’&#116 hurt &#101&#105&#116&#104&#101&#114. It’s Disgusting &#97&#110&#100 We Ate &#73&#116! True Food Facts &#102&#114&#111&#109 Around the World by James Solheim appeals to &#109&#105&#100&#100&#108&#101 graders’ love &#111&#102 the gross while sneaking &#105&#110 some history &#111&#110 the side.

* Visual Appeal. &#65&#117&#116&#104&#111&#114&#115 &#103&#101&#110&#101&#114&#97&#108&#108&#121 don’t have much &#115&#97&#121 in a &#98&#111&#111&#107’&#115 design, but author illustrators might. Larger typeface, &#116&#104&#101 generous &#117&#115&#101 of white &#115&#112&#97&#99&#101, &#97&#110&#100 &#105&#108&#108&#117&#115&#116&#114&#97&#116&#105&#111&#110&#115 &#116&#104&#97&#116 &#101&#108&#97&#98&#111&#114&#97&#116&#101 &#117&#112&#111&#110 &#116&#104&#101 text all help break &#117&#112 the string of words &#97&#110&#100 make the &#98&#111&#111&#107 less &#105&#110&#116&#105&#109&#105&#100&#97&#116&#105&#110&#103 to read.

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